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Shirataki Noodles with Red Curry Broth

Shirataki Noodles with Red Curry Broth


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Ingredients

  • 1 package shirataki spaghetti noodles, such as Nasoya Pasta Zero
  • 8 fresh Thai chiles
  • 8 stalks scallions, chopped, green and white parts separated
  • 2 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 4 Tablespoons hot sesame oil
  • 4 Cups reduced sodium vegetable broth
  • 3 Tablespoons red curry paste
  • 15 leaves fresh Chinese basil or Italian basil, chopped
  • ½ thinly sliced shiitake mushroom caps
  • Soy sauce

Directions

Preheat the broiler.

Prepare the noodles according to package directions and set aside.

Place the chiles onto foil and coat with 1 tablespoon of the sesame oil. Close foil loosely and broil until soft, about 10 minutes.

In a pot, bring the broth to a boil. Add the green parts of the scallions and half of the garlic to the broth. Keep at a simmer.

Heat the remaining 3 tablespoons sesame oil in a wok or large cast-iron sauté pan to medium-high heat. Remove the stems of chiles and place into the pan with the remaining garlic, the curry paste, and the white parts of the scallions, basil, and mushrooms. Sauté for 8 to 10 minutes.

Add the noodles and sauté for 3 more minutes, adding soy sauce to taste. Place the contents of the wok into four bowls. Ladle 2 scoops of the broth into each bowl. Garnish with fresh basil leaves and serve.


  • 1 (9-ounce 255g) package vermicelli rice noodles
  • 2 tablespoons (30ml) coconut oil (or any neutral oil)
  • 2 large shallots, thinly sliced (about 1/2 cup 75g)
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced (about 20g)
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons (30 to 60ml) Thai red curry paste, depending on your taste
  • 1/2 cup (115ml) dry white wine or lightly flavored lager or ale
  • 1 (15-ounce 450ml) can unsweetened coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons (30ml) fish sauce, plus more to taste
  • 2 tablespoons (30ml) fresh juice from 1 to 2 limes, plus more to taste
  • 1 teaspoon (5g) palm or brown sugar, plus more to taste
  • 2 1/2 to 3 pounds (1.1 to 1.35kg) mussels, de-bearded and scrubbed
  • Small bunch cilantro leaves and tender stems, roughly chopped
  • Small bunch sweet or Thai basil leaves, roughly chopped

Boil a kettle of water (or use very hot tap water). Place noodles in a large bowl and pour hot water over until they are covered. Separate strands with a fork and leave to soften, about 5 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Heat oil in a heavy Dutch oven (or heavy pot with a fitted lid) on medium-high heat until shimmering.

Add shallots and garlic and cook until soft and translucent, about 3 minutes. Add curry paste and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add wine or beer, coconut milk, fish sauce, lime juice, and sugar and bring to a simmer while stirring.

Add mussels, cover pot, and let steam until mussels open, about 5 minutes. Once mussels open, add cilantro and basil. Season broth to taste with more fish sauce, lime juice, or sugar as desired. Divide noodles into individual bowls, spoon mussels and broth on top, and serve.


What is a Broth Bowl?

Every broth bowl is a soup, but not every soup is a broth bowl. (How’s that for a mental puzzle?!)

Generally, a broth bowl’s foundation is – like it sounds – the broth. It should be really good, enough so that you want to slurp it from the bowl.

Broth bowl recipes will also typically include some type of noodles, whether it’s rice noodles, soba noodles, ramen noodles, or veggie noodles. Some broth bowls can get away with leaving the noodles out – like in a Japanese miso soup – if the broth and veggie combo is truly delish.

Aside from those two factors, the rest of the broth bowl recipe can vary – most have vegetables and some sort of protein (whether its chicken or tofu or a boiled egg), but there’s flexibility for fun here.


Shirataki Noodles Recipe Thai Curry Chicken Soup

This warming, moderately spicy Thai Curry Chicken Soup Shirataki noodles recipe started out as plain old homestyle chicken soup. It was a rainy day and I was staying in and craving warm comfort foods. Chicken noodle soup sounded so so good however, I had just returned from Whole Foods market with a bunch of exotic ingredients for Thai food including coconut milk, Thai yellow curry, Thai Chilies and an abundance of fresh organic vegetables. I decided to experiment and see what kind of low carb, satisfying, Shirataki Noodles recipe I could come up with.

I’ve often shared that I like to cook with ingredients on hand and that many of my unique recipes are created with a little “accidental inspiration” and a desire not to waste my beautiful organic vegetables. In lieu of more commonly used Thai vegetables, I used what I had in the refrigerator which was: carrots, cauliflower florets, and celery. I really enjoy the flavors in this veggie combination and it worked really well for this recipe, but feel free to use different vegetables in your own creation.

Some welcome additions or vegetable substitutions to add to your soup, might be summer squash like zucchini, tomatoes, or even a little minced Kale. Thankfully, I had staples like ginger, chicken broth, and garlic around. A squeeze of lime and some fresh cilantro finished off my Thai Curry Chicken soup perfectly. Adding angel hair (which I cut loosely into a fideo) to the soup turned it into a delicious low carb noodle soup and Shirataki Noodles recipe.

You will notice that I offer substitutions for some of the ingredients that are traditionally used in Thai cooking in this recipe. I do this because I want to offer you a traditional Thai soup recipe but know that it won’t necessarily hurt the flavors in the recipe if you substitute a few of the more exotic ingredients for ones that are more readily available at your own local grocery store. It is my experience that not every grocery store will have Fish Sauce or Thai Chilies stocked but they probably have soy sauce and red pepper flakes. The best places to buy some of the more exotic Thai recipe ingredients such as the Thai Yellow Curry used in this recipe is Whole Foods, at an Asian market, or online if you live in an area that doesn’t have a lot of selection or grocery stores.

I hope you enjoy my latest Shirataki noodles recipe Thai Curry Chicken Soup. It is Low Carb, Paleo and uses Gluten free ingredients. Shirataki Noodles Recipes are delicious as part of any weight loss or healthy eating plan.

Thai Curry Chicken Soup (Shirataki Noodles Recipe)

1 pound chicken (I prefer chicken breast), cut into small, thin slices

1 package Shirataki rice or angel hair

3 cups of chicken broth (Reserve 1/4 cup for cooking with the chicken)

3 cups coconut milk (Regular coconut milk actually tastes creamier and better than the light coconut milk in my photo)

1 tablespoon Thai Yellow Curry (Feel free to add a little more if you like)

1/2 cup cauliflower florets, cut small

2 tablespoons fresh cilantro

1 Thai Chili (Substitute red pepper flakes) minced (warning, Thai chilies are HOT)

2 tablespoons Fish Sauce (Substitute soy sauce or Bragg’s liquid aminos)

2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil

1 tablespoon ginger, minced

3 tablespoons green onions, minced

2 clove of garlic, crushed and minced

2 one inch stalks fresh lemongrass or 1/2 teaspoon lemongrass paste

1/4 teaspoon Stevia (or to taste) for a touch of sweetness

Squeeze of lime to taste, serve as garnish

Prepare your vegetables and rinse and dry roast Shirataki noodles. Remember to dry roast for just 30 seconds or less so as not to dry out your noodles. Dry roast just until they squeak when pressed in the pan. Combine broth (reserve 1/4 cup for cooking with the chicken, coconut milk, fish sauce, Thai Curry paste, and spices in a sauce pan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. While the soup is on, saute chicken in sesame oil until lightly brown. Deglaze the pan with 1/4 cup of chicken broth. Add in your chicken and vegetables and 2 tablespoon green onions to the soup and simmer for an additional 10-15 minutes. Serve with a squeeze of lime and garnish with fresh cilantro and green onions.


I am a food blog

This bowl of noodles is what you want to eat when you’re looking for a fast and cozy dinner. Creamy, spicy, full of vegetables, chicken, and noodles: perfect for warming up and relaxing after a long day in the cold.

Do you ever get home from work (or school, or wherever) and are just exhausted? The thought of cooking is absolutely draining and all you want to do is order in? I have to admit, if I were single (thank goodness I’m not), my most used app would probably be grubhub or uber eats (or postmates or doordash). I’m not embarrassed – okay, I’m a little embarrassed – to say that I actually have horrible eating habits. I let myself get incredibly hangry, so much so that I can’t even contemplate cooking. Sometimes, when I’m alone and even waiting for delivery is too much, I’ll eat a family size bag of chips and call it a night.

Thankfully we usually have a lot of leftovers in the fridge and that helps, but when there’s nothing in the fridge and I want to make something practically instant, I always think of noodles in soup. I know what you’re thinking? Soup?! That takes forever. I think my noodles in soup habit comes from eating lots and lots of packs of instant noodles in high school. Instant noodles are fast – heck, they’re even called instant! I’ll admit that I still indulge in instant noodles sometimes, but if I’m looking for quick homemade alternative, this is it.

Seriously, you just throw everything into your instant pot, wait for it to come to pressure, let it do it’s thing for 5 minutes while you boil and drain some noodles, and you’ve got dinner. This recipe is for two and because there isn’t that much liquid that goes into the pot, it doesn’t even take that long to come to pressure.

When the cooking time is done, quick release, take out your chicken and shred it and you’re good to go. Speaking of chicken, I think it’s crazy how all the online Instant Pot chicken breast recipes say that they need to go in at high pressure for 10 minutes. I’ve been cooking chicken breasts at high pressure for 5 minutes and they’ve been coming out great – 10 minutes would definitely be on the dry and stringy side. I think I might even go for 3 or 4 minutes next time. I’ll do it in the spirit of science report back to you if it works.

Anyway, I hope you get a chance to try this recipe. It’s a spicy, creamy, nutty, noodle-y bowl of comfort. There’s a little bit of spice from the red curry paste, richness from the coconut milk, and a satisfying depth from the sesame. So, so good.


These curry noodles are a great dish for feeding the whole family. They are just as easy to make fat free and raw as they are to cook up with a little coconut milk and sea salt. The recipe includes instructions for both and you can even make half raw and half cooked if you want! The cooked version would pair perfectly with some steamed cauliflower rice or potatoes and the raw version is so yummy scooped into butter lettuce. This recipe will become a favorite the whole family can enjoy together. Happy slurping!

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 zucchini, peeled
  • 1 carrot
  • 1/4 onion
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 3 cups kelp noodles
  • 1/4 cup raw sriracha sauce
  • 1/2 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon curry powder
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1/4 cup medjool dates
  • 1 limes
  • 1/4 cup basil
  • 1/4 cup cilantro
  • 1 1/2 cups coconut milk (optional)
  • 1/8 teaspoon sea salt (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

1) Thinly slice the carrot, onion, red bell pepper, and spiralize 2 of the zucchinis. Set aside in a large bowl.

2) Rinse the kelp noodles well and add to the sliced vegetables.

3) Blend together the remaining zucchini, sriracha sauce, garlic powder, curry powder, garlic cloves, dates, and the juice of one lime until smoothly combined and slightly warmed. Add 1/2 to 1 cup of water until desire consistency is reached.

4) Pour warmed curry sauce over the veggies and noodles. Serve topped with basil, cilantro, and lime juice.

FOR THE COOKED VERSION

5) For cooked curry noodles, follow steps 1 through 3 above.

6) Combine the vegetables, kelp noodles and curry sauce in a pot over medium heat.

7) Add coconut milk and sea salt. If you are only cooking half the recipe, you can half the amount of coconut milk if you want.

8) Cook over medium heat for 10 to 15 minutes until the vegetables are tender and cooked through.

9) Serve topped with basil, cilantro, and lime juice.

This item posted: 19-Nov-2016

Anthony William, Inc. - Disclaimer for Medical Medium Blog


Spicy Thai Noodle Bowls

Thhhaaaiiiii fooooodddd. IT’S SO GOOD. And so, so, so, soooo flavorful. You will never have a bland bowl of Thai food.

And this Spicy Thai Noodle Bowl…I could pretty much eat it for every meal. You know a few days ago when I posted this Single Serving Peanut Butter Hot Chocolate and was talking about how my fridge is always overflowing with food? Since I still have to consistently cook blog recipes, but my food vacuum aka husband is deployed?

Well that was not an issue with these Thai noodle bowls. I have had them at least once a day since I made them last week. If I don’t eat them for lunch at work, I eat them for dinner at home. And soooometimes both. Lunch and dinner. Variety is not the spice of life when it comes to this recipe….These Thai noodles are the spice of life. Variety, take a vacation for a week.

Alright…let me just break this down for you. The reasons why these noodle bowls make me so happy.

  1. The broth. The broth. It is PURE flavor. The perfect balance between savory, salty, spicy, and a teeny-tiny bit sweet. Garlic, scallions, ginger are sauteed as the aromatics for the broth. Throw some curry paste and chicken stock in there and let everything simmer for half an hour. Add in a touch of fish sauce, brown sugar, and soy sauce…go to Thai food heaven.
  2. The rice noodles! Seriously…rice noodles. I am so so so obsessed with rice noodles. I love everything about them. Especially the texture. If you have never had them before, they are different than regular noodles. They are softer…but they aren’t mushy (unless you overcook them). They are just wonderful! Massive fork fulls of rice noodles followed by a few unladylike slurps of broth = my happy place.
  3. The garnishes. I have had these noodle bowls a few times with no garnishes, and they are still yummy, but the garnishes add so much to the final dish. My two favorite staple garnishes are cilantro and bean sprouts. Cilantro brings brightness and extra yummy flavor to the noodle bowls, and the bean sprouts give you a wonderful, fresh crunch. The extra flavor and texture that these two garnishes bring make all the difference!

Let’s just stop writing/reading this post, throw our stuff in a suitcase, and move to Thailand right now. Sound good? LET’S DO IT.

Orrrrr we can just make these Thai noodle bowls every day for the rest of our lives and pretend that we live in Thailand? I’m good with that plan too.

I briefly mentioned slurping up this delicious broth in my #2 of noodle awesomeness above, but I think we should talk about it a little more. You know in college when we all bought a billion packages of ramen noodles and ate them every day because we were broke? For me, there was always the fork vs. spoon debate I went through each time I made a pack of ramen. They are clearly noodles…which shouldn’t be eaten with a spoon…but there is also clearly broth…which shouldn’t be eaten with a fork.

I always ended up going with the fork and doing the bite and slurp routine. I find that this is what works best with these noodle bowls too. It’s the same situation…lots of noodles, lots of broth. We need to implement a spork here and all our problems will be solved.

Here is my recommendation for consumption: stir all garnishes into your hot, steamy, spicy, flavorful noodle bowls. Collect a big fork full of noodles, put in mouth, lift bowl unceremoniously to face, slurp at least one slurp of brothy goodness…maybe two, continue until bowl is empty.

It is mildly possible that I am bite-slurping a bowl of these noodles right now as I write this post.


Keto-Friendly Shirataki Noodle Recipes

Keto Pumpkin Carbonara

If you are looking to have some creamy, savory, and cheesy deliciousness with your pasta, then this keto recipe is for you. It combines pancetta and sage to provide your palate with different levels of flavor while the pumpkin adds a creamy texture with a hint of sweetness.

This dish tastes so good that it is one of my favorite ways to prepare shirataki noodles. What’s even better is that it comes with many health benefits as well.

The pumpkin puree alone will meet your daily needs for vitamin A — a vitamin that is essential for skin, bone, and eye health. The egg yolks also provide us with thirteen essential vitamins and minerals and the eye-protecting antioxidants known as lutein and zeaxanthin. On top of that, the cheese, butter, and heavy cream in this recipe contain a fatty acid called conjugated linoleic acid, which has been found to promote fat loss. Altogether, this recipe is packed with flavor and health benefits that you will rarely find in other keto recipes.

This recipe can also easily be adjusted to meet your macronutrient needs. For example, if you need more fat and protein, add some extra parmesan and pancetta on top. To up the fat content without increasing the protein too much, consider adding an extra egg yolk and/or a tablespoon of butter or MCT oil.

Keto Chicken Pad Thai

Thai food is a flavor journey that every palate should embark on. However, most of the specialty Thai dishes are carb-based. So, what do you do when you want to tantalize your taste buds without the carbs? Make it yourself by using shirataki noodles instead of rice or wheat-based noodles.

In fact, by using the shirataki noodles, you can make this dish even healthier without missing out on any of your favorite Thai flavors.

The keto-friendly pad thai sauce combines the sweet and sour flavors of different types of citrus with the garlic, peanut butter, and a little bit of spice. This combination may seem weird at first for a westernized palate, but don’t knock it before you try it. When you have the pad thai sauce with the noodles, chicken, eggs, mung bean sprouts, and chopped peanuts, you’ll be wanting to make more after the first bite.

As an added bonus, you’ll get many health benefits from indulging in these Thai flavors as well. The garlic and green onions, for example, contain a compound called allicin, which activates anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities throughout the body that protects us from brain damage and disease. On top of that, you will reap the benefits of eating chicken, eggs, and mung bean sprouts, which are all excellent sources of b-vitamins, essential minerals, and protein.

With all of these healthy ingredients, it is hard to tell what is more profound in this keto pad thai dish — the flavor or the health-promoting benefits.

Adjusting this recipe to meet your macros is simple as well. Need more protein? Cook up some extra chicken thigh meat. Want extra fat without any protein? Add a tablespoon or two of coconut oil or MCT oil.


Beyond Ramen: 9 Japanese Noodle Recipes to Know Right Now

With coronavirus making travel a tricky and even potentially dangerous prospect this year, we’re embracing the summer staycation. All week (and all summer) long, we’ll bring you transportive flavors and travel-inspired ideas from around the world, so you can take your tastebuds on a trip and give your mind a mini vacation while you’re still at home. Here, we dip into some Japanese noodle dishes besides the beloved ramen.

The ramen craze of the last few years has certainly accomplished a lot. Not only has it shown America that ramen is way more than just some brittle stuff with a spice packet in a Styrofoam cup (or plastic-wrapped blocks of noodles that resemble Justin Timberlake’s ’90s hair), it has also opened up a corner of Japanese gastronomy that was barely known on these shores before.

And for every regrettable gimmick that has come out of the ramen wave (ramen burgers, ramnuts), there have been dozens of talented chefs who pushed the notion of the perfect bowl just a little bit further.

That being said, we’ve definitely hit peak ramen. It’s impossible to throw a stone in any moderately hip neighborhood in any moderately hip city and not have it land in a puddle of tonkotsu broth. The Chowhound community has even gone so far as to ask if the craze has all been one big hype.

But just because the ramen juggernaut has run its course doesn’t mean that there isn’t still territory to plow. Japan is home to a surplus of great noodle dishes that aren’t ramen. Between soba, udon, somen, and shirataki (the four other major Japanese noodles), there are plenty of iconic, traditional recipes as well as more obscure regional specialties for any noodle completist to plow through.

A Japanese noodle revolution doesn’t have to stop at the island nation’s shores, either. Noodles basically are just starch, after all they can take easily to a whole array of flavors. To lead the charge, here are nine Japanese noodle recipes that are in a league beyond ramen, from the super traditional to the border-smashing.


Beyond Ramen: 9 Japanese Noodle Recipes to Know Right Now

With coronavirus making travel a tricky and even potentially dangerous prospect this year, we’re embracing the summer staycation. All week (and all summer) long, we’ll bring you transportive flavors and travel-inspired ideas from around the world, so you can take your tastebuds on a trip and give your mind a mini vacation while you’re still at home. Here, we dip into some Japanese noodle dishes besides the beloved ramen.

The ramen craze of the last few years has certainly accomplished a lot. Not only has it shown America that ramen is way more than just some brittle stuff with a spice packet in a Styrofoam cup (or plastic-wrapped blocks of noodles that resemble Justin Timberlake’s ’90s hair), it has also opened up a corner of Japanese gastronomy that was barely known on these shores before.

And for every regrettable gimmick that has come out of the ramen wave (ramen burgers, ramnuts), there have been dozens of talented chefs who pushed the notion of the perfect bowl just a little bit further.

That being said, we’ve definitely hit peak ramen. It’s impossible to throw a stone in any moderately hip neighborhood in any moderately hip city and not have it land in a puddle of tonkotsu broth. The Chowhound community has even gone so far as to ask if the craze has all been one big hype.

But just because the ramen juggernaut has run its course doesn’t mean that there isn’t still territory to plow. Japan is home to a surplus of great noodle dishes that aren’t ramen. Between soba, udon, somen, and shirataki (the four other major Japanese noodles), there are plenty of iconic, traditional recipes as well as more obscure regional specialties for any noodle completist to plow through.

A Japanese noodle revolution doesn’t have to stop at the island nation’s shores, either. Noodles basically are just starch, after all they can take easily to a whole array of flavors. To lead the charge, here are nine Japanese noodle recipes that are in a league beyond ramen, from the super traditional to the border-smashing.


Watch the video: Konjak Shirataki Noodles Rindfleish Teriyaki Rezept - Low Carb 198kcal


Comments:

  1. Amiram

    Comrades, this is a treasure trove! masterpiece!

  2. Zolosida

    snowman



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